Santé et bien-être

La santé des humains est intimement liée à celle de la planète. Nous avons besoin d’eau douce, d’océans propres et d’espaces naturels où se concentre une grande variété d’animaux, d’insectes et de plantes. Promouvoir l’éducation et le divertissement dans nos espaces naturels a toujours fait partie de la philosophie de Sierra Club depuis sa fondation en 1892.

Air pollution drama at my home

So there I was on that sunny summer afternoon, just getting started with our Sierra Club Canada project, “Breathe Easy,” to measure air pollution all across Ottawa. I was working from home, all the windows open, when suddenly there's a cacophony of clattering noise starting up somewhere in the neighbourhood and a real stinky smell wafting into the yard and in through my windows. I investigate to find that a local hedge trimming company has unleashed a team of three ardent cutters on my adjacent neighbour's back yard. I close up all my windows and whip over to see what's going on.

How's the Air Where You Live Today?


What prematurely kills some 500 people in Ottawa every year, and about 14,600 in Canada?

It’s air pollution. How serious is that? As I stated in an opinion piece published in the Ottawa Citizen (see link below), that’s about as deadly as the COVID-19 pandemic.  Halfway through 2020, about 240 people had died in Ottawa from the Covid-19 virus and about 7300 in Canada.

Opposition to Ring of Fire Increases

As revelations mount about problems with mercury contamination from the now closed De Beers Victor Diamond Mine in Attawapiskat, opposition to proposed Ring of Fire mining projects soar. Claims by the Wildlands League that the company did not release the monitoring results for mercury contamination at 5 of 9 monitoring wells, received a boost on January 13, 2020, when Justice David A. Thomas ruled that these claims of violation of Ontario environmental laws could proceed to trial.

Rejoignez-nous et regardez votre effet papillon en action !

Il y a quelques semaines, j'ai vu mon premier papillon de la saison. Après un hiver au climat capricieux, et au milieu de la crise sanitaire actuelle, la vue de cette jolie petite créature - d’un orange flamboyant sur l'herbe morne du printemps, avec ses ailes qui battent doucement - a été un baume pour mes yeux et mon cœur. (Ce n’était pas un papillon monarque. Je suis toujours en train de faire des recherches - peut-être était-ce un papillon belle-dame (Vanessa cardui ?))

Best Practices for Staying Connected to Nature During Covid-19

We find ourselves in unprecedented times. We are working hard to adapt to the new normal and do our part to reduce the spread of the virus. We encourage you to stay connected to nature in what can be difficult and stressful times. Although we cannot be in nature together, we can still enjoy the outdoors apart! Spending time in the fresh air is helpful for mental health and staying active during this time. Here are our best practices for how to enjoy the outdoors responsibly.

1. Stay Up to Date with Local Health Authority Guidelines

Join Us and Watch Your Butterfly Effect In Action!

A few weeks ago, I saw my first butterfly of the season. After a winter of erratic weather, and in the midst of this current health crisis, the sight of this beautiful little creature – its brilliant orange set ablaze against forlorn spring grass, with its wings gently fluttering – was a gift to my eyes and my heart. (It was not a Monarch. I’m still researching – perhaps it was a painted lady (Vanessa cardui?)

Ontario Chapter hiring two summer interns

We have Canada Summer Jobs (CSJ) grants to support two positions: a Research & Communications Intern and 'The Problem with Plastics' Intern.

Please review the job listings below, apply if you are interested, and share with others. We look forward to hearing from you!

Note: to qualify for CSJ positions you must a) be between 15 and 30 years of age at the start of the employment; and b) be a Canadian citizen, permanent resident, or person to whom refugee protection has been conferred.

Wild Child Spring Programming Was a Huge Success! Big Thanks to All Our Participants!

Picture this:
There is a group of fifteen five year old kids exploring a nearby forest. They are wandering around, digging holes, walking on logs, listening for birds - even stopping to look at rabbit droppings! With a magnifying glass in hand, these nature detectives are on the hunt to discover all the hidden treasures nature has to offer.

This is a typical day for our participants at our Wild Child Nature Immersion Program.